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RE: Query Part 3 – Merging Queries in The Raiser’s Edge

Querying is such an important function in The Raiser’s Edge® that we are dedicating a three-part series of blogs to the topic. Part 1 reviewed Taking Control of Your Raiser’s Edge Queries and Part 2 focused on Working to Get the Most from RE: Query. Now, we turn our attention to another important operation to maximize your efficiency – merging queries in RE!

Analyzing the data we store in Blackbaud’s The Raiser’s Edge 7 is an important task. The first step is creating a list, which is done in the Query Module. Queries are requests for information resulting in groups of records (constituents, gifts, events, etc) based on choosing certain criteria.

Often, the group you need isn’t based on one set of criteria. Queries give the best results when the criteria are kept simple. If you need a group of records based on complex criteria, the best option is to merge two simple queries together.

When merging queries you’ll select a primary query, secondary query and a merge operator.

“AND” Operator
In this example, you are planning an event in South Carolina and would like to invite alumni. You need a list of alumni who live in South Carolina.

The primary query will consist of all alumni and the secondary query will consist of everyone who lives in South Carolina.

When you merge the queries using the AND operator, the final query will consist of those who are alumni that live in South Carolina.

“OR” Operator
In this example, you’re planning a big stewardship event. You need a list of major donors and board members.

The primary query will consist of all donors who have given a total of $1,000 or more over the last 12 months and the secondary query will consist of board members.

When you merge the queries using the OR operator, the final query will consist of all major donors and all board members. If a board member is also a major donor, he or she will only appear in the final query once.

“XOR” Operator
In this example, you’re sending a mailing to either those who are alumni or are volunteers but not those who are both. The primary query will consist of all alumni and the secondary query will consist of all volunteers.

When you merge the queries using the XOR operator, the final query will consist of only alumni or only volunteers and will remove anyone who is an alumni and a volunteer.

“SUB” Operator
In this example, you are sending an appeal for a new campaign. You need a list of donors who haven’t given in the last two years, but do not want to include anyone who has ever given to the capital campaign.

For the SUB operator, the order of the primary and secondary query is important. The primary query will consist of all constituents whose last gift date is greater than 24 months ago and the secondary query will consist of those who have ever given to the capital campaign.

When you merge the queries using the SUB operator, the final query will consist of those who haven’t given in over two years but not those who have ever given to the capital campaign.

By merging queries together, you are able to see different groups of constituents, participants or gifts that wouldn’t be possible with one single query.

 

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